Where can I find out current home mortgage rates for my area?

Does anyone know where I can find out the current mortgage rate averages for my geographic area? I’m looking at possibly refinancing and want to know if it would be worthwhile. Also, can I expect any costs when trying to refinance?

By | 2013-08-26T13:18:55+00:00 August 26th, 2013|Mortgages Home Loans Interest Rate|4 Comments

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4 Comments

  1. kishaloy_bhowmick August 26, 2013 at 3:00 PM - Reply

    What is your credit score? Depending on your credit score you can get the financing . If your score is greater than or equal to 500 then you will have a 100% financing for 30 years payback arm with interest in the higher fives and lower sixes .In other cases also you will have mortgage loan but the thing is if your credit score is less then you have to have downpayment or your rate of interest increases .
    For higher credit scores for refinancing the rates can be made even lower.
    Your income and years at the current job also comes into picture .

    kish garner
    kishgarner_acacia@yahoo.com
    Phone # 480.751.4125
    http://www.acacia-mortgage.com/

  2. the dream August 26, 2013 at 2:47 PM - Reply

    You could do all the legwork or let someone do it for you. Take 30 seconds and fill out the free evaluation form at

    http://www.totaldebtsolutionsllc.com

    and I will have a loan officer contact you with answers to all your questions. You don’t have to limit yourself to a loan officer in your area. Good luck!

  3. buyhawkeye.com August 26, 2013 at 2:33 PM - Reply

    Simple answer. Consult a mortgage broker in your region. We shop for the best rate available to be competitive over other brokers and lenders. A competent mortgage broker will know the day’s prevailing rates.

    You will be paying fees for your loan. Period. We don’t work for free, right? So there are four ways to express those costs. You bring cash to closing (a rarity in my area these days–though typically the best solution), build the costs into the loan amount, raise the interest rate charged to cover closing costs, or a combination of the previous three.

    Best of luck.

  4. orlandomortgagebroker August 26, 2013 at 2:16 PM - Reply

    All over ONLINE. The only problem is, that you don’t get that rate until you lock it, or you have a honest mortgage broker on your side, which might be willing to lose on the Yield Spread if he doesn’t lock it, if rates happen to go up, from the day you were quoted on Good faith Estimate.

    The minute you’re quoted a rate you like to proceed with, instruct lender or broker to lock, and provide form that states the fact and that their committed to lend at that rate.

    When lenders “lock”, they commit to lend at a specified interest rate and points, provided the loan is closed within a specified “lock period”. (Points are an upfront charge expressed as a percent of the loan amount). For example, a lender agrees to lock a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage of $200,000 at 7.5% and 1 point for 30 days. A lock is contingent on the borrower meeting the lender’s underwriting requirements for the loan.

    The need for locking arises out of two special features of the home loan market: volatility and process delays. Volatility means that rates and points are reset each day, and sometimes within the day. Process delays refer to the lag between the time when the terms of the loan are negotiated, and the time when the loan is closed and funds disbursed.

    If prices are stable, locking isn’t needed even if there are process delays. If there are no process delays, locking isn’t needed even if prices are volatile. It is the combination of volatility and process delays that creates the need for locking.

    For example, Smith is shopping for a loan on June 5 for a house purchase scheduled to close July 15. Smith is comfortable with the rates and points quoted on June 5, but a rate increase of 1/2% within the following 40 days could make the house unaffordable, and Smith doesn’t want to take that risk. Smith wants a lock, and lenders competing for Smith’s loan will offer it.

    If locks were equally binding on lender and borrower, locks would not cost the borrower anything. While lenders would lose when interest rates rose during the lock period, they would profit when interest rates fell. Over a large number of customers they would break even.

    In reality, however, borrowers are not as committed as lenders. The number of deals that don’t close, known as “fallout”, increases during periods of falling rates, when borrowers find they can do better by starting the process anew with another lender. Fallout declines during periods of rising rates.

    This means that locking imposes a cost on lenders, which they in turn pass on to borrowers. The cost is included in the points quoted to borrowers, which are higher for longer lock periods. The lender who quoted 7.5% and 1 point for a 30-day lock, for example, might charge 1.125-1.25 points for a 60-day lock.

    Years ago, lenders controlled lock costs by requiring borrowers to pay a commitment fee in cash. The fee was returned to them at closing but forfeited if they walked from the deal. But today, commitment fees have mostly died out. Borrowers don’t like them, and lenders and mortgage brokers don’t want to place themselves at a disadvantage in competing for customers.

    To control lock costs today, many lenders refuse to lock until borrowers demonstrate commitment to the deal by completing one or more critical steps in the lending process. For example, one lender recently explained its lock policy to its mortgage brokers as follows:

    Our loans are well priced, but we only commit to you when you commit to us. To lock, you must submit the completed lock form, application (original, no copies allowed), credit report, appraisal, and either a purchase agreement or escrow instructions.

    The logic of this lender’s policy is that its procedural requirements reduce fallout costs, allowing it to offer lower prices. Lenders who make it easy to lock have large fallout costs because some shoppers will lock with them as protection against a rate increase while they continue to shop for a better deal elsewhere.

    While the best (honest) quote is likely to be from a lender who requires extensive documentation to lock, these requirements impede effective shopping. For example, if the shopper identifies the lender offering the best deal but it takes 3 days to lock with that lender, the shopper is in limbo for 3 days. He has to hope that market rates don’t increase during the period, and if they do that the lender doesn’t pad the increase.

    A mortgage shopper thus needs to know what each lender requires to lock, and how quickly the process can be completed if the shopper does her part. A good mortgage broker can help enormously. Brokers know lender lock requirements, can help expedite the process, and will keep the lender honest if the market changes during the lock process.

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